An Open Letter to President Higgins

President Higgins

Dear President Higgins,

You are about to start a historic visit to the United Kingdom and I have no doubt that the schedule planned for you and Mrs. Higgins during this trip is interesting and full.

In a recent article in The Irish Times you raised some interesting questions. “What is necessary to human flourishing? What human capabilities does Irish society encourage, genuinely enable, or block?” I suggest that you may find some answers to those questions if you include in your visit a meeting with John Moat and a visit to any of the four Arvon houses in the UK. What is The Arvon Foundation? In its own words “Arvon is a charity that works to ensure anyone can benefit from the transformative power of writing.” Don’t you find that wonderful? That anyone can benefit? John Moat, with the late John Fairfax, founded what became Arvon over 40 years ago in Devon. To date there is nothing comparable in Ireland that offers a residential experience to anyone who wishes to write, away from everyday distractions, responsibilities and habits and that also actively engages with schools and many underserved communities. Nor one with the simple apprenticeship model of Arvon, each 5 day residential course led by two experienced writers.

Instead in Ireland there is an ad hoc provision of writing courses, writing centres and writers augmenting their income through teaching. Indeed I offer some of these courses myself. Arts officers here strive to support all the creative arts within increasing budgetary constraints and a public discourse that veers between questioning the relevance of the arts and attempts to yoke the arts to an economic project. The support available to a writer too frequently depends on the area in which they live. The writers I have worked with over the past few years have shown me again and again the value of the process of writing, how the sudden discovery as the pen leaks words onto the page changes lives in a myriad of minute ways. It’s about writing but it’s always about more than writing. When I lectured in Adult Literacy Studies in the past, particularly in the area of Family Literacy, the class always came alive when I introduced them to creative writing, to story, using the method developed by Pat Schneider, founder of Amherst Writers and Artists. Pat has written that “Art is the creative expression of the human spirit, and it cannot – it must not, for the sake of the human community – be limited to those few who achieve critical acclaim or financial reward.” I think you appreciate better than most that if appropriate conditions are put in place then creativity, and people, can flourish. For example, it is likely that there will be an increase in the numbers of writers emerging from north Dublin because of the existence there of Fighting Words and the work of Sean Love and Roddy Doyle. There will consequently also be many, many more young people in that area growing into adulthood with increased confidence in their own voice and their ability to express themselves. As Gianni Rodari said:

“Every possible use of words should be made available to every single person … not because everyone should be an artist but because no one should be a slave.”

There is quite a list of Irish writers who have taught on Arvon courses, from the late Seamus Heaney through Paul Durcan, Anne Enright, Carlo Gebler, Hugo Hamilton, Patrick McCabe, Shane Connaughton, Medbh McGuckian, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Thomas McCarthy, Colm Tóibín and others to Leanne O’Sullivan and Julian Gough, yet none seem to have brought back the spirit, the idea of Arvon to Ireland. I find this very puzzling. Seamus Heaney judged, with Ted Hughes, the very first Arvon poetry competition and was a patron of Arvon until he died. An essay of his is included in a book called ‘The Gist: A Celebration of the Imagination’, recently published in acknowledgment of the work of John Moat. Also included as an appendix in this book is Ted Hughes’ ‘Arvon and Education’ in which he says that “we have to acknowledge what is perhaps not much acknowledged – that far-reaching inner changes, creative revelations of our inner self, the only part of us with any value, are usually triggered in the smallest fraction of time.” If there is to be one piece of writing that I would press on you to read in relation to the importance of developing a residential writing centre here, modelled on Arvon, it is this essay by Ted Hughes.

In ‘Renewing the Republic’ you wrote that “Unlike the characters in a play, we can change the script of our lives. We can reflect on the choice of selves, societies, masks and fictions. If we lock the arts away for an occasion, for an evening, for an indulgence, we lose out on much of their potential for the future, and for their revelatory and pleasurable potential now.”

Now to return to your recent questions: “What is necessary to human flourishing? What human capabilities does Irish society encourage, genuinely enable, or block?” Establishing a residential national writing centre in Ireland would serve as the tangible symbol of a belief in the importance of writing as a vital part of the creative arts and also provide real support for developing writers of all ages. There would also be opportunities for cultural tourism. It would provide a focus for the development of a community of writers, teaching opportunities for writers, and also “ensure anyone can benefit from the transformative power of writing”. It is my belief that many people in Ireland, indeed Irish society as a whole, would benefit and flourish from such a development.

Kind regards,

Margaret O’Brien

 

 

 

 

 

 

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12 responses

  1. […] My Open Letter to President Higgins was written out of a sense of frustration and not a little anger on my part. I […]

  2. […] Higgins has replied to my Open Letter and you can read his elegant response in full […]

  3. Hi Margaret,
    Well done on your fine letter to our President Michael D. He must, as an artiste/poet, appreciate such a well written missive, and duly take note.

    1. Hi Tony, wouldn’t it be marvellous if that happened? Thanks for reading and commenting – let’s see if this idea can somehow be turned into reality. Best, Margaret

  4. Your voice is so clear. Your message so important. This beautiful letter is calling us all, Margaret.

    1. Thanks for taking the time to read and comment Patricia. I feel very strongly about this issue as you might guess.

    2. geraldine mernagh | Reply

      Dear Margaret
      You have somehow managed to put into words something that is essential for all of us to take into account at every level of society. But particularly now as the media are full of the word recovery, which is limited in its meaning to “economic recovery” at a lending and borrowing level. You are talking about real recovery and real people and real lives.

      Well Done
      Geraldine Mernagh

      1. Thank you Geraldine for your insightful and supportive comment – let’s all put our voices together on this.

  5. Well said, Margaret. Let’s hope your letter falls into the right hands.

    1. Thanks for reading and your comment Jean and let’s continue to hope 😉

  6. Reblogged this on Wait til I tell you – blog of Irish writer Orla Shanaghy and commented:
    Fellow blogger Margaret A. O’Brien has written a thoughtful and beautifully expressed open letter to President Michael O’Higgins on the occasion of his state visit to the UK this week. As an Irish writer and creative writing tutor, Margaret is idealky positioned to comment on the current state of writing as an art form in Ireland. Here is her letter in full.

    1. Thank you Orla for reblogging this post and for your supportive comments.

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